Power of Place

My First Home

999C749A-9D58-447F-AD4B-A1591966595B

 

Where we love is home - home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

    There is no place like home. I have had many homes, but none are as important to me than my first home. In the quiet town of Harvard, Massachusetts laid a white house on the top of a hill. The house overlooked an eight acre land which was illuminated by the pink and orange pigments of the majestic sunset.  This is where I spent the first decade of my life. As I was growing up I thought I would never leave my home. I thought I would never leave the rusty old swing set where my sister taught me how to swing; I would never leave the trampoline where my brother tried to teach me how to flip; I would never leave the ten foot apple tree which shaded our blue mural collie lying under it; I would never leave the living room, where in the winter the fire roared in the chimney; I would never leave the dining room which held my first ten birthday’s; I would never leave my bedroom where my yellow tabby cat laid by my sleeping feet. But like all things nothing lasts forever. In fifth grade everything changed. My parents decided to move to Concord near the schools my sister and I were going to. As I walk through the front door of our new house I thought to myself “I guess this is my new home.” But deep inside I knew that this wasn’t my new home. My home was still back in Harvard, in the white house that laid on a hill. Just like people you have a relationship with places and things; relationships which are fortified and made stronger over time just like relationships with people. I made a bond with my old house, a bond which will never be broken, and over the years I have made a bond with my new house built by new memories. A place isn’t important to you because of it’s features, it’s important to you because of the memories it brings.


Power of Hardship

    Better or for Worse

 

EA20E434-48D3-4D6D-B0FB-C65FA15FBE9A

Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength- Arnold Schwarzenegger   

    

    Hardship can make us stronger or weaker. How my family came together after the passing of my grandma showed me that we can either or rise up or crumble against adversity. Hardship defines who we are, we can either become better from it or let it tear us down. The death of a family member is always tough, especially when the family is so big. My dad had seven siblings, some of them were even in high school when he was born. So when ever there is a family reunion it is a big gathering. I was never really close with my grandma, I maybe saw here every few years here and there. It is the same with my cousins, with so many of them I don’t even know half of them. So as I sat down in the chapel where the funeral took place, I didn’t know what to expect. I had never been to a funeral before, and from the movies I assumed it was a somber event full of tissues and tears. The funeral began with beautiful hymns and verses from the bible, the traditional start to a funeral. Then came the moment when family members were allowed to speak. As my aunts and uncles got up I expected it be a somber moment, but it was not. My aunts and uncles were not talking about how my grandma had died, but instead talked about how she lived a great life. As the funeral ended and I walked into the reception it was not a room full of sadness and grief, but one of smiles and hugs. It is a sad moment when passes away, at first it may be shocking, you may be full of grief, it is a tough moment for anybody to go through, but my family came together and faced the hardship with the best possible attitude. you will face many hardships through life, some will be harder to get trough than others, but your decision whether you will let yourself be brought down or if you will take the opportunity to rise up.


Power of Passion

Passion is a Strength not a Weakness

7691BD46-5750-4297-ADC1-3B0F42A62EE1

    Follow your own passion—not your parents’, not your teachers’—yours.” —Robert Ballard

 

    Without passion we are lost. I found my passion in a sport unlike any other ... Hockey. If we are not passionate about anything we are  lost, left in the dark tunnel with no light at the end to lead us out. Once I step on the ice my mind clears, and all I can think about is the wind on my face and the puck on my stick. It was a Thursday night, a night of panic and stress. With an interview the next day, a science test, and hours of homework, I was stressed out. I felt trapped, lost in a tunnel, overcome overcome with panic and stress. I fumbled around in the tunnel of darkness, searching for any will I had left to do the rest of my homework and prepare for my test. Then a light illuminated the tunnel. I ran to the end of the tunnel and into the rink. As I stepped on the rink, my skates sliced the ice, the wind cooled my face and blew away any worries I had. My mind cleared discarding any worries I had. The practiced started as I skated fast down the ice looking for hole in our defense. I found one as the defensemen slowed down preparing for a hit. Without any time to think I cut to the middle, evading the shoulder of the defensemen. The puck fell behind me and as I reached for the puck I saw in my peripheral vision the second defensemen drop his shoulder. In an effort to keep the play alive I chipped the puck pass the defensemen as I got drilled. My teammate picked up the puck and proceeded to skate to the net.Without passion everything is a burden. Homework is a burden, applications are a burden, tests are a burden. We spend a lot of time doing things we don’t enjoy, we need to find something to do that we do enjoy. Hockey is the thing I enjoy doing most. Hockey is my passion, and when I’m on the ice I am home. 

 

 

 

 


The Call of the Wild

Andy Barton

Literary Analysis

Fitzsimmons English

10/23/18 

The Beast Locked Within Us All

8EBE7129-9782-435A-9DB6-5D5616B99D46

    

Buck stood and looked on, the successful champion, the dominant primordial beast who had made his kill and found it good.” (The Call of the Wild, Chapter 3)

 

    Buck stood victorious, watching the speck of what was once Spitz plummet into the abyss below. Blood coated Bucks matted fur, transforming the St.Bernard into a predator. Buck’s primordial beast had awakened, warning all those who were watching that if challenged it would stand victorious. Then they retreated back to the camp, Buck and his primordial beast had survived. In the book The Call of the Wild, written by Jack London, Buck’s primordial beast is released by our oldest primal instinct, survival. At once an innocent dog living on a ranch, turned into a bloodthirsty hound thirsty for flesh, we see Buck’s primordial beast struggle to survive over the course of the book. 

Continue reading "The Call of the Wild" »


Recess Recall

Passing of 59% nitrogen, 21% hydrogen, 9% carbon, 7% methane, 4% oxygen

A5A18789-3E9C-455F-BCAD-3086FAA8CC98

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”-Gandhi

    

When I walked in for my recess recall I was given two options, serve it and miss the most important soccer game of my life, or write a 250 word blog about recess recall. I am now about 38 words into writing this blog. Recess recall is a broad subject, the broad theme of this essay. So I’m going to narrow the theme, the narrow theme is about my recess recalls. This ends my opening paragraph which is under 90 words (the recommended amount).    

 

    The most notorious recess recall I have received was in 6th grade S.S. class given to me by Mr.Obeng. I was in the middle of class when I received a natural urge. As a result from consuming my fruit snacks, Oreos, pretzels, and a Pacific Cool Capri-sun gas had built up in my intestines. I decided to silently release my gas. In one swift movement my pelvic muscles released the gas into the air. The result wasn’t so silent. In quick and impromptu effort to advert the attention from me I accused Jake Ewing of this heinous act. This resulted in a “he said” “he said” situation. The end result was face of triumph and a face of disapproval. In a final act of rebellion on the recess recall sheet, under reason, I simply put “I farted”. Mind you I was in 6th grade, so I would never do something that childish again. On the recess recall sheet this most recent time I put “ligma”. This ends the 250 words about recess recall (by writing this last sentence I exceeded the proper amount).

  


The Primordial Beast

A Step Forward or Backward? 

“Far more potent were the memories of his heredity that gave things he had never seen before a seeming familiarity; the instincts (which were but the memories of his ancestors become habits) which had lapsed in later days, and still later, in hum, quickened and become alive again.” -Jack London, Call of the Wild

67BA7F50-C744-4974-9400-ECF84D55C08B

    There is a primordial beast inside all of us, just waiting to be unlocked. The Call of the Wild, an adventure fiction novel written by Jack London, is about the main protagonist Buck, a St.Bernard canine,  unlocking his primordial beast. The thing about the book that struck me most was the eloquence in which Jack London wrote it. It made me feel like I was really there with Buck. This allows me, the reader, to really dig deep into the situation Buck was in, and think about what I would do in that given circumstance.  Jack London challenges all of us to think about the primordial beast locked inside all of us, and what would happen if we were given the key to it. What would we do? Would we resist? Throughout the book Jack London gives his answers to the questions in the form of dogs and their relationship to their more primal ancestors, wolves.

 

Continue reading "The Primordial Beast" »


Technology

 

A Resource...Run Out

By Andy Barton and Timmy Smith

1DC4835C-8549-4957-986B-D94B7C8FA338


“Dude, my power won’t turn on.”

“Same, I tried turning on my Xbox for like an hour and nothing was working.”

“I don’t know, it could just be one of those mini power outages, but what if it’s worse.”

“If it is worse, I don’t know if I could even live.”

“With no Fortnite, no iPad, and no College Football on Saturdays, I’m not sure I could live, even for just a week.”

“What are we going to do? Read books? Bike to each other's house? It’s not the 1980’s.”

“Wait, shh, I think I hear my parents talking about it upstairs.”

“Did they just say what I think they said?

“Did they just say… No that can’t be right.”

“Shh be quiet.”

“No no no, I can’t live like this!”

“Dude, what stuff doesn’t use technology?”

“I can’t even think about that right now!”

“Does gas equal technology?”

“Does that really matter right now? What really matters is that I can’t watch the Patriots game tonight.”

“No. What really matters is that we don’t have heating. I heard it goes down to 40ºF tonight.”

“Since when are you a science nerd, all I care about is my video games.”

“What about my ramen? I’m pretty sure I need electricity to make that.”

“What about my artichoke? I need my artichoke to be refrigerated.”

“That’s disgusting.”

“But seriously, what happens to all the food in our refrigerator?”

“Let’s just eat it all real quick.”

“What happens when we run out?”

“Maybe we could eat the bananas.”

“What about when the bananas run out?”

“I don’t know about food, but how will we get around? Don’t cars have technology?”

“I mean we could ride our bikes, but where would we even need to go.”

“What about our parents jobs? Don’t they need technology to drive to work?”

“Don’t they need technology to actually do work?”

“I don’t know, how will the world even run with no technology?”

“Yeah, how are we going to get news? How am I going to able to call Halmoni? She lives in New York!”

“What’s a ‘Halmoni’?”

“That’s what I call my Korean grandmother.”

“I call my grandmother ‘Grandma’.”

“All right, enough of this tomfoolery, let’s get back to the fact that we have no technology.”

“Like what are people going to do? What did people do before big Benny flew that kite?”

“I don’t know, watch other people fly kites.”

“Also, what happens when it gets dark?”

“Use a candle.”

“What kind of weirdo just has a bunch of candles laying around in their basement?”

“Wait and also to light a candle, don’t you need a lighter which uses technology.”

“You could also use a match.”

“What about when you run out of matches? How are you going to drive to buy more matches?”

“I’m still just worried about watching the football game tonight.”

“Wait a second, a thought just popped in to my head, isn’t everything important in the world need technology”

“Bruh”

“No way”


A Short Summer

The Gifts of a Moment

“Appreciate what you have and who you have, because the future can take it all away from you anytime.”

-unknown

   CB53B066-9ED3-45A8-8441-D1B0D5E7B668

    I sat on top of a rock which overlooked the great valley below me. Scattered with rocks and snow it laid still, untouched by man. The wind swept in; blowing away the dust from the rock next to me, as well as the din of tourists. I was in Zermatt, Switzerland on a trip with my family. I picked up a pebble and reached my hand out above the 300 foot daunting fall to the base of the mountain. I examined it, for it was tiny compared to me. I dropped the rock and it plunged down. I watched as it became smaller and smaller, eventually escaping my vision. Then just seconds after I was holding it, the rock was at the bottom of the mountain, probably never to be touched again. These moments with family and these trips are like the rock. In a matter of seconds my time with them with vanish. Soon enough I will be at college or boarding school and my time with them will be cut in half. This round trip around Europe made me realize the importance of family and the appreciation of the present.

 

    

Continue reading "A Short Summer" »


A Game to Be Remembered

 

Seven Minutes and Thirty-Three seconds...

 

 

     74FDBB08-4BA3-43CE-A9A1-FAD45C99E4B5

   

“I knew he was going to score”

-Tim Thomas

 It was May 27th, 2011. I was six years old, but still I can recollect what happened that day. It all started with an email to my dad a few days earlier. One of my dad’s friends had gotten season tickets, but couldn’t make it to the game. But she knew we were a big Bruins family, so she offered the seats to us. When my dad told us the house exploded in bedlam. My sister, Ellie and I had never been to a bruins game. Hours before the game my sister and I got dressed up in appropriate attire, bruins shirts and face paint. My babysitter at the time offered to paint our faces, we each were given the decision of what player’s number we wanted on our face. My sister chose Lucic, because she had the same number as him. I chose Marc Recchi, the 43 year old grinder. As we entered the car I could not contain my excitement, we were going to go watch the Bruins game live! Little did I know how important that game was.

 

Continue reading "A Game to Be Remembered " »