Final "All Quiet Analysis."

War doesn’t end with pen on paper. In Chapter 11 of All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarqué, Paul has known how much the war has affected him both physically and mentally. Paul has seen hundreds of men die, some being good friends others being mortal enemies. Germany has lost but he is ordered to keep fighting, that's what has killed his friends. Paul has lost many friends to this inhumane war, all of his friends and mentors have died very gruesome deaths. The war has driven Paul crazy and has hurt him physically and mentally. Paul has been driven insane by this grievous war. He knows that if he doesn’t go insane he’s going to die fighting, like the rest of his friends. At this point Paul is tired of fighting, everyone’s mood is down because “every man here knows that we are losing the war”.  The war has taken such a toll on Paul so he finally steps back and realizes what the war has changed about him. He is sitting around in the barracks while everyone is asleep and Paul is wide awake thinking what the war has done to him, and his friends that are no longer with him. His mind runs wild of what he has seen during these horrible years, but that thinking can't bring back his friends. 

Thus we live a closed, hard existence of the utmost superficiality, and rarely does an incident strike out a spark. But then unexpectedly a flame of grievous and terrible yearning flares up Those are the dangerous moments. They show us that the adjustment is only artificial, that it is not simple rest, but sharpest for rest.

Paul has finally realized what this war has done to him. The war has changed Paul, he has seen his friends die from shots to the gut or being blown to smithereens by landmines. Paul has risked his life in this grievous war but still he has been lucky to survive and live life with the sharpest struggle in life. Paul and his remaining comrades have only started the war with themselves. The war may be coming to a close but the internal fight has just begun.

The aftermath of war isn't just physical. 

Finalite; the only ending that is assured. In chapter 11 of All Quiet On The Western Front Paul and his friends are hopeless, the war is practically over with the U.S joining the fight and his friends along with himself must face the harsh finality of loss. The finality of Paul’s war leaves his friends dead. Paul has seen many die, many are his foes by one command; many are his comrades, the only thing these men share is pain and the drive to win the war. As the war rages on, Paul is faced to watch his crew slowly die. The war is almost certainly over with the U.S joining and Paul is in Russia on the lines and he knows that they will not survive.

It is true, such things are often simulated, but the pretence itself is a symptom. Berger, who means to finish off the dog, is carried away with a wound in the pelvis, and one of the fellows who carry him gets a bullet in the leg while doing it. Müller is dead. Someone shot him point-blank in the stomach with a Verey light. He lived for half an hour, quite conscious, and in terrible pain.

As Paul is there watching his friends die he is faced with the horrible finality of this, “ Leer groans as he supports himself on his arm, he bleeds quickly, no one can help him. Like an emptying tube, after a couple of minutes he collapses.” Though this is horrible Paul knows that there is nothing to do, for he has seen men dying in front of him his whole adulthood. It is the only guaranteed ending. “Bertinck, falls. He was one of those superb front-line officers who are foremost in every hot place”. Pauls knows this is the end for his battalion “Our hands are earth, our bodies clay and our eyes pools of rain. We do not know whether we still live.” Paul has seemingly lost everything, “Kat falls. We two are alone. I bind up his wound; his shin seems to be smashed. It has got the bone, and Kat groans desperately: "At last--just at the last--"”. 

War only has two guaranteed endings for all men and women; finality and pain. 


Final "All Quiet Analysis."

War doesn’t end with pen on paper. In Chapter 11 of All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarqué, Paul has known how much the war has affected him both physically and mentally. Paul has seen hundreds of men die, some being good friends others being mortal enemies. Germany has lost but he is ordered to keep fighting, that's what has killed his friends. Paul has lost many friends to this inhumane war, all of his friends and mentors have died very gruesome deaths. The war has driven Paul crazy and has hurt him physically and mentally. Paul has been driven insane by this grievous war. He knows that if he doesn’t go insane he’s going to die fighting, like the rest of his friends. At this point Paul is tired of fighting, everyone’s mood is down because “every man here knows that we are losing the war”.  The war has taken such a toll on Paul so he finally steps back and realizes what the war has changed about him. He is sitting around in the barracks while everyone is asleep and Paul is wide awake thinking what the war has done to him, and his friends that are no longer with him. His mind runs wild of what he has seen during these horrible years, but that thinking can't bring back his friends. 

Thus we live a closed, hard existence of the utmost superficiality, and rarely does an incident strike out a spark. But then unexpectedly a flame of grievous and terrible yearning flares up Those are the dangerous moments. They show us that the adjustment is only artificial, that it is not simple rest, but sharpest for rest.

Paul has finally realized what this war has done to him. The war has changed Paul, he has seen his friends die from shots to the gut or being blown to smithereens by landmines. Paul has risked his life in this grievous war but still he has been lucky to survive and live life with the sharpest struggle in life. Paul and his remaining comrades have only started the war with themselves. The war may be coming to a close but the internal fight has just begun.

The aftermath of war isn't just physical. 

Finalite; the only ending that is assured. In chapter 11 of All Quiet On The Western Front Paul and his friends are hopeless, the war is practically over with the U.S joining the fight and his friends along with himself must face the harsh finality of loss. The finality of Paul’s war leaves his friends dead. Paul has seen many die, many are his foes by one command; many are his comrades, the only thing these men share is pain and the drive to win the war. As the war rages on, Paul is faced to watch his crew slowly die. The war is almost certainly over with the U.S joining and Paul is in Russia on the lines and he knows that they will not survive.

It is true, such things are often simulated, but the pretence itself is a symptom. Berger, who means to finish off the dog, is carried away with a wound in the pelvis, and one of the fellows who carry him gets a bullet in the leg while doing it. Müller is dead. Someone shot him point-blank in the stomach with a Verey light. He lived for half an hour, quite conscious, and in terrible pain.

As Paul is there watching his friends die he is faced with the horrible finality of this, “ Leer groans as he supports himself on his arm, he bleeds quickly, no one can help him. Like an emptying tube, after a couple of minutes he collapses.” Though this is horrible Paul knows that there is nothing to do, for he has seen men dying in front of him his whole adulthood. It is the only guaranteed ending. “Bertinck, falls. He was one of those superb front-line officers who are foremost in every hot place”. Pauls knows this is the end for his battalion “Our hands are earth, our bodies clay and our eyes pools of rain. We do not know whether we still live.” Paul has seemingly lost everything, “Kat falls. We two are alone. I bind up his wound; his shin seems to be smashed. It has got the bone, and Kat groans desperately: "At last--just at the last--"”. 

War only has two guaranteed endings for all men and women; finality and pain. 


Short Story Dialogue Only

 

 

 

“How did you get that, where was it?”

“Over the hill.”

“ No.”

“Yes, it was”

“. How’d you get there?”

“I ran past them.”

“Are you injured, are you bit?” 

“No, I don’t think so.”

“How does it work?”

“ I don’t know, it’s practically ancient”

. “Maybe he will not know what it is.”

“No, we can't risk it.”

“Maybe this could cure them.”

“ How could you possibly know that?”

“ I don’t but we have to try”

“ No we cant, we will figure it out ourselves. 

“Ok but if it doesn’t work we have to ask him.”

“ Ok. Grab a book and sit down.”

“What book was in one of the ancient libraries?”

“ I don’t know. Boston's library is full of things that are from the ages of primitive men. Just start looking.” 

“Ok. You go left, I'll go right.”

“ Look under the electronics and media area.”

“ Ok. I’ll wait an hour trying to figure this out.” 

“Hey! I think I found something. It says hold the button on the side.” 

“Which one, there are 3?”

 “The one on the right side.”

“ Some symbol showed up, it looks like an apple with a bite out of it, it says it needs the battery to be charged.”

 “Well what are we going to do, we don’t have one of those.”

 “He might.” 

“No, we can't risk it, we have to find something else.” 

“But where.”

“I don’t know but we have to find it somewhere else.” 

“We have to leave.”

“No, we have to check the outlets first. I'll look along this wall, nothing for me here.”

“ I found one. “

“So plug it in”

“Woah, some kinda video started.”

“ What are you waiting for, press play”

“I don’t believe it.”

 

“ mayday, mayday the experiment went horribly wrong, it's worse than we could have possibly imagined ”


All Quiet On The Western Front Letter From Paul

 

~Jacob Hershenow

All Quiet On The Western Front

Letter From Paul To Me

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More than kisses letters mingle souls.
~John Donne

Dear Jacob ,

 

 It has been a very long time since I’ve sent you a letter. I hope you are in good health and mind. The front has been tormenting me. The rigorous schedule leaves me with no sleep. If I manage to fall asleep I am quickly awakened by the wretched sound of death from the bombardments. Though i have become numb to that, it is no more than an alarm telling me to wake up, but in this case if I don’t i will be blown to pieces.

    My companions and I are still in good health considering how hopeless we are. We are still one of the only groups left with minimal casualties. The days seem to melt away because of the endless repetition of death and destruction. Life is no more but a game of black jack, a gamble step one way your head will be blown off the other you’ll be fine. Lucky for me I have become desensitized to this way of life.

    The front lines have become my way of life. Though we have little to no hope left we still cling on to the few things that we have left living or at least not blown to pieces. I just cling onto the thought that I might see my family. I have been notified by my sister that my mother has fallen Ill once again, she thinks it is cancer. I just hope dad will be able to rest after this, I fear that he will be overwhelmed with his colossal workload.

    I hope I will get sent on leave soon, I can't wait to lie down and not have my bed be disintegrated by bombardments in the morning. I do hope my friends and I will live to that time but I have become so desensitized to death I would not be scared if I would be faced with the face of death. I do hope to see you soon, please send more letters. I want to hear about life back home.

Sincerely,

Your friend, Paul


All Quiet On The Western Front Letter From Paul

 

~Jacob Hershenow

All Quiet On The Western Front

Letter From Paul To Me

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More than kisses letters mingle souls.
~John Donne

Dear Jacob ,

 

 It has been a very long time since I’ve sent you a letter. I hope you are in good health and mind. The front has been tormenting me. The rigorous schedule leaves me with no sleep. If I manage to fall asleep I am quickly awakened by the wretched sound of death from the bombardments. Though i have become numb to that, it is no more than an alarm telling me to wake up, but in this case if I don’t i will be blown to pieces.

    My companions and I are still in good health considering how hopeless we are. We are still one of the only groups left with minimal casualties. The days seem to melt away because of the endless repetition of death and destruction. Life is no more but a game of black jack, a gamble step one way your head will be blown off the other you’ll be fine. Lucky for me I have become desensitized to this way of life.

    The front lines have become my way of life. Though we have little to no hope left we still cling on to the few things that we have left living or at least not blown to pieces. I just cling onto the thought that I might see my family. I have been notified by my sister that my mother has fallen Ill once again, she thinks it is cancer. I just hope dad will be able to rest after this, I fear that he will be overwhelmed with his colossal workload.

    I hope I will get sent on leave soon, I can't wait to lie down and not have my bed be disintegrated by bombardments in the morning. I do hope my friends and I will live to that time but I have become so desensitized to death I would not be scared if I would be faced with the face of death. I do hope to see you soon, please send more letters. I want to hear about life back home.

Sincerely,

Your friend, Paul


All Quiet On The Western Front Chapter 9 review

By~ Jacob Hershenow 

Decisions Decide The Character Of A Man 

What would you do in the face of terror

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Life presents many choices, the choices we make determine our future

~Catherine Pulsifer  

What a man does in the face of choice determines his true character. In chapter 9 of all quiet on the western front Paul is faced with many difficult choices to make, one of them being helping a wounded Russian soldier. Paul decides to help the man instead of running away and pretending nothing happened.

The eyes shrink back as the hand comes, then they lose their stare, the eyelids droop lower, the tension is past. I open his collar and place his head more comfortably.His mouth stands half open, it tries to form words. The lips are dry. My water bottle is not there. I have not brought it with me. But there is water in the mud, down at the bottom of the crater. I climb down, take out my handkerchief, spread it out, push it under and scoop up the yellow water that strains through into the hollow of my hand.

He really does try to do all he can to help this helpless man, this choice really showed Paul’s true character, a loyal, brave, and overall a good person. Another theme in this chapter is change. When Paul is sent to Russia he had no idea as to what he should expect, Whalen he arrived he was introduced to a horrific battle field with dead men spread out over the trenches.

In the branches dead men are hanging. A naked soldier is squatting in the fork of a tree, he still has his helmet on, otherwise he is entirely unclad. There is only half of him sitting up there, the top half, the legs are missing."What can that mean?" I ask."He's been blown out of his clothes," mutters Tjaden.

this really depicts the horrid state that the trenches are left in and it really paints a gruesome image. The way that Paul and Tjaden say, “he’s been blown out of his clothes” Shows how they are used to this tip of thing but they are still surprised to see such a gruesome video game like occurrence.

This chapter really showed the harsh reality that solders have to go through. If you were Paul, what would you do? 


Chapter 8 of All Quiet On The Western Front literary analysis

~Jacob Hershenow and Caleb Fehm

Sympathy Is What Maintains A Mans’ Humanity

 

Witnessing pain for long enough can make you feel it

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Though simpathy alonecant alter facts, it can help to make them more bearable.

~Bram stoker

Witnessing pain for long enough can make you feel it.In chapter 8 of All Quiet On The Western Front, Paul, a young soldier, experiences sympathy, pity, and commiseration for people that he has no way of saving. his work at the prison of war camps, his mothers sickness, and his fathers helpless reality leads to intense feelings of powerlessness because he can't help them.

[ I see their dark forms, their beards move in the wind. I know nothing of them except that they are prisoners; and that is exactly what troubles me. Their life is obscure and guiltless;--if I could know more of them, what their names are, how they live, what they are waiting for, what are their burdens, then my emotion would have an object and might become sympathy. But as it is I perceive behind them only the suffering of the creature, the awful melancholy of life and the pitilessness of men.]

In chapter 8 of All Quiet On The Western Front Paul watches as countless men die, death becomes the only reality for the Russian men, “The burial is quickly over” exemplifies the Solomon way for life for these men. They work and they die again and again for that is the only reality. As Paul is subjected to watch the hopeless men in extreme anguish day after day he starts to feel their pain.“ The days go by. On a foggy morning another of the Russians is buried; almost every day one of them dies”. The grim and repetitive way of life numbs the harsh reality of death for Paul for the people held captive and the soldiers who witnessed the constant death.

Paul genuinely does feel the pain that the captive are feeling because he feels really bad for them and he pitted them very much. But after a long time people have become numb to this way of life. In Chapter 8 of All Quiet On The Western Front two weeks after Paul returned home his mother remains sickley, his father and sister come to visit him at the barracks and his dad proclaims that his mother has cancer again and that she will have to get treatment. Paul knows that his father doesn’t have money for it, but his father is willing to do it anyways.

[Do you have any? money at all?"He shakes his head: "No, but I can do some overtime."I know. He will stand at his desk folding and pasting and cutting until twelve o'clock at night. At eight o'clock in the evening he will eat some miserable rubbish they get in exchange for their food tickets, then he will take a powder for his headache and work on]

This quote exemplifies the hapless reality of life in the lower class of Germany. The hardships that his father goes through are shown in these few sentences. Paul truly knows the struggle that his father is going through, Paul feels sympathy towards the harsh way of life his family is living; he genuinely does pity them.

Sympathy is the only thing that keeps a man from becoming an animal in the face of terror.


Chapters 6 and 7 Of All Quiet On The Western front by Jacob Hershenow

 

 

~Jacob H. Hershenow

Chapters 6 and 7, Terror And Affinity

The contradictions of war and peace

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Only the dead have seen the end of war.

— George Santayana, 1922

 

 As I read chapters 6 and 7 of All Quiet On The Western Front, I went on an emotional roller coaster; from the horrific video game-like reality of life, to a mellow, peaceful, and serene trip back home, these chapters were like yin and yang, a perfect juxtaposition of life in the face of death.

Chapter 6 is created with painfully descriptive and grim details with no piece of information left unveiled to the reader; the gruesome and vivid picture that Erich Maria Remarque evokes many emotions to the reader. In Chapter 7 it is more of that, the way Erich plays with your emotions is masterful, it is beautifully crafted.

In chapter 6 of All Quiet On The Western Front paul is sent to front lines with his company and they are subjected to ceaseless fire from the French, and they are running low on spirit.

[Night again. We are deadened by the strain—a deadly tension that scrapes along one's spine like a gapped knife. Our legs refuse to move, our hands tremble, our bodies are a thin skin stretched painfully over repressed madness, over an almost irresistible, bursting roar. We have neither flesh nor muscles any longer, we dare not look at one another for fear of some incalculable thing].

 However chapter 7 is tranquil, with Paul’s way back home comes many congenital moments.In chapter 7 Paul is sent on leave and he can finally find peace after the horrific reality of the front lines, he can finally rest, a rather long block quote that exemplifies this is: 

[There are no bugles and no bombardments, the children of the house play in the skittle-alley, and the dog rests his head against my knee. The sky is blue, between the leaves of the chestnuts rises the green spire of St. Margaret's Church. This is good, I like it].

These two chapters are almost direct opposites; The appalling description of the death of the front lines in chapter 6 really exemplified how horrible war is. Though in chapter 7, life is described as peaceful, simple, and relaxing. Erich really showed the true reality’s of war and how unforgiving it really is. Chapter 7 showed who war and normal ways of life are direct contradictions. These two chapter really showed the reality of life for the soldiers.

After all is said and done, these chapters are some of the most brilliantly crafted pieces of literature ever.


What makes someone the most happy.

Topical essay

What is true happiness

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In this piece of writing, I (a thirteen year old boy) will attempt to answer one of the most perplexing questions in all of mankind; what makes you the most happy? I will be investigating this question by dissecting  some of the most commonly suggested answers to this seemingly unanswerable question. Things like money, fame, and family are some great answers to this question, but which makes a man the most happy.

One of the greatest questions of all of mankind, a question that not even the smartest could answer. Can money buy you happiness? Yet I, a 13 year old, will attempt to answer this centuries old queries; can money buy happiness? When you have enough money, the world seems to be at your fingertips. There is nothing materialistic that you can't have, and that is the problem. You can't buy love, relationships become fake and forced, all because they want your money. Though you can buy that cool Lamborghini that you wanted since you were a kid, and the astonishing private jet they are all just things, a big piece of metal, will that give you happiness? Well the answer isn’t as complicated as it might seem although the countless opinions constantly contradict each other. My answer to this question is yes and no. Although that nice new car will make you feel over the moon, it will not keep you happy forever, that is the pitfall to the question. So yes money can make you happy but it will not satisfy the feeling forever, it can't buy you a loving family, and it most certainly can't buy you lasting happiness.  

Now, one of the runner up for one of the most controversial questions of mankind. Can fame make you the most happy. Now with fame comes many things, popularity, money, and many problems. When you are famous, popularity isn’t always a great thing. Your privacy has vanished, any issue that you have, in days it will be public. Justin Timberlake once said, “the worst thing about being famous is the invasion of privacy”, and Tom Felton said, “the idea of being famous is a lot better than reality”, and lastly, Finn wolfhard said, “If anyone’s comfortable being famous, they’re a psychopath. All of those quotes are true examples of what may suck about being famous Now don’t get me wrong, great things can come with being famous like money, and some really good friends. Personally I don’t think I could handle being famous, there is too much pressure, and nowadays culture is still extremely prevalent. It seems to feel as though you are stepping on eggshells. Though I’d love to be in a blockbuster movie or sing a billboard song there is too much pressure to be great. I feel great things come with being famous, but there are too many bad things.

Another great opinion for the one of the most impossible questions of all time is, does family make a person most happy? In my personal opinion, family does have the most upsides out of the main contenders to this seemingly un-answerable. Family gives you something to live for, there is a purpose for everything you do, because you want the well being of your family. Though there can still be a feud, subconsciously you will always semi-care for their well being. Now the issues with family can go just as low as the highs. Your family can make you feel a seemingly limitless amount of pressure. Though there seems to be more highs than lows, the lows are pretty bad, in my opinion, bad enough to offset the highs. So that still leaves us at a standstill.

So, after all of this extensive contemplating over this seemingly unanswerable question, what do you think makes someone the most happy?


WW Fenn A Dream Within A Dream Recited By Jacob H. Hershenow

A Dream Within a Dream
By: Edgar Allan Poe 
 

 
 
Take this kiss upon the brow!
And, in parting from you now,
Thus much let me avow —
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.
 
I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of the golden sand —
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep — while I weep!
O God! Can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?
 
 
 
What Really Makes Reality


. The poem
A Dream Within A Dream By: Edgar Allen Poe,  is a fabulous poem with so many masterful techniques . The poem constantly has phrases that puzzle the reader and inspire thought. This poem does not have a clear location or time, nor does it have a where. The author did this because it makes reality a mystery, a thought, a theory. The author is clearly questioning what really makes reality and what makes imagination.  The phrase I find the most significant is

I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of the golden sand —
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep — while I weep!
O God! Can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?

 This block quote really captures the true essence of the poem. This theme is validated because the structure of the poem is heavily based of the theme like in the phrase, “ in a vision, or in none, is it therefore less gone”. This phrase really questions reality to make the thought, what really is reality.I really like this poem because it gets the idea of reality is what you make of it. This was an eloquently written poem and I love the meaning of it.

 

 

      My Thoughts 

This poem was very fun to learn. With each sentence you can uncover a new meaning and theme. The poem is written with many visual cues to inspire thought. Overall this poem was very deep and was beautifully written. I think i could have been more productive with my memorization but i still got a good understanding. I also feel i did well  my iMovie, though there were 1 or two slip ups i still think i did well. I really enjoyed ww fen this year because it was more hands-on and the process of making the i move definitely helped with the memorization.  Now when i think back to WW Fenn all i can think of is joy with a little bit of stress woven throughout the journey.